We’ve talked a bit about how you are showing up in the world.  The big “a-ha!” moment comes when you realize that how you show up in the world is a CHOICE- you are not trapped in a fixed way of being.

By changing who you are being, you automatically shift how you are showing up in the world.

Let’s look at how we are being in the light of the Three Pillars: Being Present, Living in Full Responsibility, and Personal Power.

Being Present

First off… are you being present? Or are you deeply involved in the “monkey mind” chatter in your head?  Your constant internal conversation takes you out of the present moment (affecting your interpersonal communication and evaluation skills), and it causes you to see things through the filters of your internal conversation (which often consists primarily of distorted representations of past events).  The more present you become to the situation you find yourself in, the more practical access you’ll have to the foundational competencies you learned about being a teacher.

Being present requires the force of conscious awareness, but it can be achieved as simply as taking a deep breath and stilling the internal dialogue, if only for a few seconds.

Taking Full Responsibility

In the light of the second pillar- are you taking full responsibility for who you are being, the circumstances around you, and the reality you are constantly creating?  Who you are being comes across loud and clear in the world of responsibility.  Enemies of full responsibility are complaining, blaming, and excuses.  Listen to your casual conversation.  Is it peppered with any of these three responsibility avoiders?  If it is, you have a clue as to the places in your thinking where you are not taking full responsibility.

Complaining is simply our response to situations that we don’t like – but we don’t want to take the risk or effort to change them.  Think about it- no one complains about things that they can’t change.  Do you ever hear people complaining about gravity?

Blaming is an effort by our mind (conscious and subconscious) to keep “looking good”.  If we don’t fix the blame on someone or something else, we worry that it may fall on us and make us look bad.  When you blame, who you are being is someone who is abdicating some level of control, giving away your power.

Excuses… well, we all know about excuses.  And I think we would all agree we don’t want to be the person who is always making excuses.

Is who you are being in line with being fully responsible?

Personal Power and your Core Beliefs

The third pillar is Personal Power.  Who you are being is directly related to your level of personal power.  And your level of personal power is directly dictated by your core beliefs: beliefs about yourself, beliefs about others, and beliefs about the world.  Any time you hear yourself say the words “I am…” or “People are…” or “Life is…” pay close attention to what comes after, because what comes after will be a direct affirmation of one of your core beliefs.

If you believe that you are shy, who you are being in any given situation will be vastly different from someone who has the belief “I am outgoing”.  If one of your core beliefs is that people are inherently good and trustworthy, who you are being will contrast with someone whose belief is that people are bad or untrustworthy.

It is a worthwhile exercise to find out what your core beliefs are- many beliefs we have we are unaware of.

Your personal power is simply a gauge that shows up through who you’re being… a gauge that measures what you believe is possible.

So What?Choose who you're being - CreateMotivate

So, who are you being?  In this moment, in moments of conversation, in moments of working with your students? In the language of some of the basic competencies of teaching:

  • Who you are being will inform how you use your knowledge.
  • Who you are being will determine the level of success you experience in your interpersonal relationships.
  • Who you are being will dictate your level of professionalism.
  • Who you are being will color your abilities to evaluate student needs.

And, perhaps most importantly, who you are being will directly correlate with how you show up in the world.

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